Anatomy Of A Trade

I’ve been asked by my investment group to present an anatomy of a trade I made last month.  It was a trade based on a company with a good business model but trading on what I can only say is a lot of hype.  A dangerous combination but the plan and the rules I followed can apply to any trade or investment.

The key to any successful trade is having a plan and following your rules.

For this example, depending on how one looks at it, I broke at least one rule and followed many others.

Wednesday November 8th:

ROKU closed at $18.84 per share.  They were due to report their first quarterly report since going public and most everybody was pessimistic.  The company had yet to make money and were set to continue their losing streak.

I considered them a popular, trendy streaming, cord cutting alternative product that had a good business model.  I have been exploring cutting the cable cord and have purchased a long range HD antennae as well as one of ROKU’s streaming sticks.  The tech is not what impresses me.  In fact, they are practically giving it away.  That is not where they plan on making their money.  Roku intends to make their money on programming and selling advertising.  In order to do that successfully, you need market penetration.  Roku is making their hardware cheap to get it into people’s homes and build up market share.  But Roku is also teaming with HDTV makers and having their streaming service imbedded in today’s popular smart TV’s.

If you think about Microsoft in the early years of the PC, they basically gave away the OS so that they could gain market share and sell software and ultimately services.  ROKU is attempting to gain market share with the adoption of HD 4K smart TV and imbedding their platform (the OS) in each TV sold.  From there, they focus on selling content and advertising.

So I was really torn.  On the one hand I really liked the company.  On the other, they were still young and had yet to prove that they could succeed in this highly competitive online content streaming world.  So I held off on buying until I saw which direction the stock moved based on their report and outlook.

Well, it turns out that ROKU is still not profitable but they lost a lot less than expected and absolutely killed it on user activations and loyalty.  So much so that ROKU even tossed out the possibility of becoming profitable as soon as next year.

What happened next was Simply Amazing.

Thursday November 9th:

ROKU opened at $24.75.  A 31% increase over the previous day’s close.

I bought 100 shares.

Here are the rules I broke.

  1. Chased the money
  2. Bought after the stock had already passed profit taking zone. (see notes below)

Here are the rules I followed or (at least) did not break.

  1. I bought on volume.  Institutional confirmation
  2. I bought at an early entry point below the buy point.  IBD had the buy point at $30 per share based on previous highpoint shortly after initial IPO.  But this early entry is OK based on institutional buying.

Yes, these rules are a little fuzzy and subject to interpretation.  Here is my point of view.

Depending on how one looks at this, from an IBD perspective, I may have broken 3 rules…. or not.  Technically the profit taking zone (20% – 25%) is after a breakout past a buy point.  Sometimes it is OK to buy a small position before a buy point if institutional buying is there.

As soon as I bought my shares and saw that they did not stage a reversal, I placed a trailing stop.

Rules I followed:

  1. Protect capital and gains.  At this point I was protected from taking a loss.  –  Unless the stock happened to gap down at the next open….

Friday November 10th:

I canceled my trailing stop and sold 50 shares shortly before close at $35.16 for a 41% profit.

Note: The stock closed at 33.21 which would have been below my trailing stop, but because I had cancelled it to sell half my gains, I still had 50 shares invested.

Rules that I broke:

  1. Changed my rule of setting and keeping my trailing stop to protect profits.

Rules that I followed:

  1. But this was done to protect my profit from the downside risk of a gap down.

I reset my trailing stop right before close.  I fully realized this would not protect my remaining shares from a gap down on Monday’s open but I truly believed that the “hype” was not over.  After all, we still had all the weekend traders (those who only follow the market and their stocks on the weekend).  Sure enough, there were many articles hyping the breakout stock.  Even IBD got in on the action and published a “hype” article.

Monday November 13th:

No gap down at open!  Hype and irrational exuberance was still in full force!

But even hype has it’s limits and …

Sometime during the lunch hour my trailing stop got activated for $45 a share.

And… I was out with a 81% profit on those remaining 50 shares.

And an overall profit of 61%.

 

Lessons Learned:

Rule #1 to investing is not to lose money.  Or at least minimize your losses.

  • I utilize trailing stops on almost all my trades.

Rule #2, see #1  😉

  • But seriously, I also use trailing stops to protect my profits.
  • Yes, I sometimes get stopped out of a stock on a sudden drop or as those who think of conspiracy theory, on a sudden drop by MM to flush out weak hands.  But, hey I usually make a profit and if I still like the stock, I can always get back in.

Rule #3 I base a lot of my buy and sell points on percentages and not dollar values.

  • For me this is a pure psychological rule.  I learned early on that I could get hung up on “making money”.  Sometimes people start seeing all the $$$ signs and let their emotions rule their investment and trading decisions.  I am no different.  So I try and base all my buy and sell decisions on percentages.
  • Do I ever sell too early and miss out on future gains?  Yes, but if my goal is 20% profit, then I am happy.  Would you be happy with a 20% gain on your investments?  The percentages are there to manage risk and avoid letting my emotions (such as greed) take over.
  • Do I ever sell too early and get stopped out of a loss before the stock recovers?  Yes, but not all stocks immediately recover and the stop loss is there to minimize my losses and protect my capital.

Rule #4 is you need money to make money.

  • Don’t lose all your hard earned money to the stock market, irrational exuberance, or emotional trading decisions.
  • Follow rules # 1 and # 2.

 

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The Amazon Effect

Amazon is, and has been, transforming the way we do business.  They have been doing this for years.  At the core of this transformation is what I will say is the Online World.  Yes it is a generalization, but from being able to buy books online to a cloud service provider to a mobile payment platform and even a one click buy it now system to most recently high profile deals with NIKE, SEARS, and Wholefoods; Amazon is transforming the way we do business from traditional brick and mortar to online.

According to Millennial Marketing, Amazon rates highest in satisfaction and experience not only with Millennials, but across other generations because of “its consistent ability to reduce friction in the consumer journey and stay at the forefront of market innovation.”

It even beats out other brand names such as Apple and Netflix in customer satisfaction and both Apple and Netflix do an excellent job with online marketing and innovation.

And how has practically the whole retail sector, and investors, reacted?

The retail sector has taken a nose dive.  Both investors and publicly traded companies have stuck their heads in the ground and proclaimed that Amazon is taking over the world and the end is near.

Grocery stores such as Kroger and even Walmart took a dive when Amazon bought Whole Foods.

Blue Apron IPO took a beating because Amazon now has a potentially huge food delivery network.

Home Depot and other similar stores took a dive when Amazon agreed to sell SEARS Appliances.

Even NIKE has agreed to add Amazon as a delivery channel for their product.  But NIKE is smarter than some of the other retailers.  Part of their agreement is for Amazon to crack down on fake NIKE knock offs.  Not only do these cheap imitators take revenue away from NIKE, but they also damage the NIKE Brand and the NIKE reputation.  So the NIKE deal with Amazon is actually a good thing for them.

Home Depot does sell appliances.  So does Lowes and Best Buy.  HHGregg went out of business because they failed to adapt and could not compete.  But stores like Home Depot and Best Buy are more than just appliances and they happen to have good online presence and customer loyalty.  A fellow blogger recently wrote about this here.  Check it out.

I think the entire retail sector has over reacted and the recent Amazon effect on the retail industry has created some good potential bargains.

The key to retail success today is how well do you market to and retain the mobile online consumer?

A company basically has three options.

  • Agree to be bought out by Amazon.
  • Develop a successful one stop shop and buy mobile campaign and customer loyalty program similar to Amazon.
  • Or join Amazon to make your product and your brand stronger and more available to the online world making it easier to buy.

I’ve already mentioned how NIKE has taken advantage of Amazon.  Here is another company which I have written about in the past and has done remarkably well recently.

GRUBHUB.

They make online ordering, and reordering, quick, simple and easy.  It fits the millennial mobile mode of online shopping perfectly.

However, on the surface, their business could appear to be threatened by Amazons move into the food and food delivery business much like Blue Aprons.   But they too have “joined” Amazon in a very interesting way.

You can use Alexa to order food from GRUBHUB.  They have taken advantage of the Amazon effect and incorporated it into their business model with hands free ordering.   This is not without possible risk.

Amazon has been accused of poaching sales from retailers.

“A study by Upstream Commerce, a retail intelligence firm that tracks pricing, suggests that Amazon will use the pricing data from outside merchants who sell through it to ultimately compete with them.  In women’s apparel, 25 percent of the top products initially offered by marketplace vendors were sold by Amazon within 12 weeks, according to the report.”

Other retailers have directly and indirectly acknowledge “competition” as a future risk and as a result, many good quarterly reports have sent stock prices down instead of up solely because of this “competition” in the market.

GRUBHUB reports this week.  They had an outstanding report three months ago.  It will be interesting to see if the Amazon effect is viewed as a boost or a bust for their business.

Disclaimer:  This post is meant for informational and conversational purposes only.  It should not be viewed as a recommendation to buy a particular stock or fund.  As always, please do your own additional research before buying stocks.

Will Prime Day Be A Good Day For Amazon Stock?

What is Prime Day?

Amazon started Prime Day in 2015.  It is typically a one day special event of deals and discounts on just about everything available to amazon prime members. This year, It will be held July 11th.

However, as it is with most special commercial celebrations, and yes – Prime Day was started to celebrate the anniversary of Amazon, this year Amazon Prime Day starts at 6pm the day before, July 10th.

Of course the real reason for Prime Day is to generate more Prime memberships, to build a base of consistently returning customers and, therefore, reoccurring revenue. Amazon is even expanding their event to more international customers to the count of 13 countries around the world.
Many consumers will use this day to test Amazon’s Prime service, and many of those customers will remain Prime members once their trial membership is done.

Studies have shown that Prime customers spend more than twice what nonmembers do, so it’s no wonder Amazon is trying to spread the Prime love as much as it can.

I’m sure Jeff Bezos would say it is a “Win + Win” deal.

How popular is it really?

Amazon doesn’t disclose precise numbers, but some analysts estimate that Prime Day 2016 may have generated $525 million in sales for Amazon, up 26 percent from Amazon’s projected sales of $415 million in 2015.

According to Amazon, the company sold more than 90,000 TVs, over 1 million pairs of shoes, 200,000+ headphones, 23,000+ iRobot Roombas, and more than 14,000 Lenovo laptops on Prime Day alone. That beats the number of sales the retailer generated on Black Friday, which for most retailers is considered to be the biggest shopping day of the year.

How easy is it to find deals, shop and buy?

This year, with the added global access and even greater push for trial access to Prime, the Amazon App (which is always free) and Amazon gadgets (Echo – Echo Dot w/Alexa, Kindle, Audible, Dash, etc) there promises to be yet more Prime Day records broken. Amazon will be running specials not only online but through their mobile channels (Echo, Kindle, Audible) with specific deals targeted for users of these devices.

How easy is it? Just ask Jeff Bezos . . .

Just kidding, but it is getting easier and easier to purchase not only what you need for day to day living but for all those impulsive moments as well.

The power of ecommerce has even forced the worlds largest sport and leisure shoe manufacturer, NIKE, to re-think their strategy and start selling directly to consumers thru Amazon and Instagram. It’s an online world and most consumers have mobile devices which they care with them for instant online access.

Mobile ecommerce only makes sense.

I wonder if NIKE will be “online” in time for Prime Day? As of this writing (July 4th) I did not see their direct link listed on Amazon yet.

Are there Prime Day issues?

Yes, with this popularity there have been issues with finding good deals on products you actually want as well as general supply and demand. There have been many instances of consumers complaining that many of the special deals are not always on things they want, or are of cheaper quality than they expect, and for the items they are searching for, difficult to find and then when they do find them the deal is either over or sold out.

This year Amazon is helping you out by suggesting to download their app from which you can look up the schedule of daily deals and place a watch on the ones you want. This way the app will alert you when the special is about to start.

You can even download an Amazon Assistant to your desktop to help you stay up to date on your wish lists and orders.

How does Amazon stock react to Prime Day?

This one is a bit more difficult to answer. For one, this is just the third year that Amazon has hosted Prime Day. And two data points, or data sets, does not a pattern make – other than a straight line.
However, in 2015 the stock price increased the week before and kept increasing the week after.

In 2016, the stock price increased the week before but then went down the following weeks.

So what will happen this year?

Lately tech stocks, including Amazon, have been beaten down by the market. Will Amazon’s stock price continue its downward trend or will prime day provide the opportunity for investors to look at Amazon stock as another online bargain and reverse the trend?

My personal opinion is that Amazon, as well as many other tech stocks, has a bit more to fall. There may be a few fake reversals but to date the stock is only down 5%. Hardly the correction needed to inspire investors to scoop up a bargain.

What are your thoughts?

Time Travel

I don’t usually do a lot of traveling for work, but lately I have been playing the role of part time road warrior.  All of my travel has involved long flights to the west coast.  Strangely, jetlag doesn’t bother me too much.  The biggest issue I have with the time difference is the fact that the markets open just when I am waking up and close by 1 pm.  Which is often one of the busiest or most time crunched periods of the day for me.  I’m used to reading up on investment news while having a leisurely breakfast, having all day to see if I get any alerts, or not, for possible trades at the end of the day.  This traveling between time zones has totally thrown off my routine, changed the way I follow the markets and even the way I post on my site.  I am using the wordpress android app for the very first time.  

My question to readers is this.  Are the any road warriors out there who actively follow the market and their investments?  If so, what tips, tricks and tiolsbof the trade do you have in your arsenal?

Tracking The IBD 50

I love looking at data, discovering new trends, and finding hidden cause and effect relationships.  That is probably why I like spending hours analyzing computer event and security logs.   I also tend to do the same thing researching the stock market, especially when I notice a dramatic change.  In this case, I noticed a lot of new stocks listed on the weekly IBD 50 list.  So, I started something that I have been meaning to do for quite some time but never really got around to it.  Until now.

Tracking the IBD 50 list.

We all know the only state the market stays in is a constant state of change.  Prices fluctuate every day, every minute.  And it stands to reason that any watch list will do the same, though not necessarily on a daily basis.  My “gut” was telling me that the IBD50 list had been fairly stable and now quite a few new members had joined the list.  Conversely, this meant quite a few had fallen off of the list.  Of course I wanted to see the evidence for myself.  So I sat down and started plotting out the last two months or so of reports.

This is what I came up with.

Listed below is the stock symbol, IBD’s Group Classification, and the week the stock appeared / or not on the list.  If it appeared on the list the number is the ranking IBD gave it from 1 – 50 with 1 being the best of the best.  If it did not appear on the list then that week is left blank.

Now I have not had a chance, nor enough back testing evidence, to find out if these changes are due to quarterly reports, market conditions, changes in market cycles, investor/consumer sentiment, hype, fear, or some combination of all of the above.   But at least I seem to have enough proof that my gut was right.

Breaking it down into adds, drops, returns (on,off,back on again), and stay(remains on the list each and every week) and by sectors we get the following.  This was an attempt to see which sectors are strong and remain on the list, weak and dropping off, and gaining by being added to the list.

I’ll be tracking this further as time goes by and reposting any additional insights but I thought I would get it out there for those of you who might be interested.